Curriculum

At Mount Pleasant we have worked carefully to create a curriculum that meets the needs of our learners. We deliver the entire National Curriculum and all other statutory curriculum subjects, including:

Subject
When and How it is Taught?
English Taught daily each week
Maths Taught daily each week
Science Week long Learning Questions throughout the year (see curriculum overview)
Geography 2 week long Learning Questions throughout the year (see curriculum overview)
History 2 week long Learning Questions throughout the year (see curriculum overview)
Computing Weekly digital literacy across the curriculum Week long Learning Questions throughout the year (see curriculum overview)
Art Weekly mark making & manipulation Week long Learning Questions throughout the year (see curriculum overview)
Design Technology Weekly mark making & manipulation Week long Learning Questions throughout the year (see curriculum overview)
PE Weekly PE lessons
Music Weekly music appreciation & singing Week long Learning Questions throughout the year (see curriculum overview)
Languages Weekly Spanish lessons
PSHE Weekly PSHE lessons
RE Week long Learning Questions throughout the year (see curriculum overview)
Learning Questions

In order to develop our pupils’ knowledge, skills and understanding, learning for some subjects (see the table) is organised as a week or 2 week long study. This is to immerse the children and enable them to focus on one area. By learning in this way, our pupils are supported to develop their vocabulary, know more and remember more. Each of these studies uses an overarching ‘macro’ Learning Question to engage the children in thinking about the learning. Within the study are ‘micro’ questions so that children understand each of the steps on their learning journey.

The partnership between parents and teachers is vital and here at Mount Pleasant Junior School, it has been identified as a strength: Home and School recognise the value and importance of education.

Parents are their children’s first teachers, so equipped with information and understanding about what your children are learning ; what key skills they need; and key concepts they need to understand, together, we can work to ensure that they receive their curriculum entitlement and achieve their potential.

Each child is unique and we know that one size does not fit all. Below we have provided a handbook which is focussed on the National Curriculum expectations for each year group. We support all pupils in our school to progress and attain, from different starting points and, as appropriate, with additional support. These handbooks are a guide to enable and support and complements our ongoing conversations with you and your child about their learning.

Learning Questions

Geography
Computing
History
Art
Science
Design Technology
Religious Education
Music
MPJS Curriculum Handbooks
Curriculum Subjects

Mount Pleasant Junior School – Our Text-led Approach to English Teaching

At Mount Pleasant Junior School, children will experience a rich and diverse range of literature, representing different authors, illustrators, genres and forms from different times, places and perspectives that will enable them to:

– Become confident, competent and committed independent readers;

– Engage and respond in a variety of ways, with regard to their maturity, preferences and experiences;

– See themselves reflected in what they read and to have high-quality opportunities to investigate and appreciate the lives of others vicariously;

– Explore different ethnic, social and cultural contexts broadening reading experience and building awareness of the world they live in;

– Meet literary challenges with stamina, curiosity and enquiry;

– Develop as inspired, motivated and accomplished writers.

In consideration of this, children’s literary encounters will include:

– Studies of high quality whole and part texts created by long-established and contemporary authors, illustrators and poets representing ethnic diversity, different themes and which invite/promote discussion, speculation, analysis, comparison, response and enjoyment;

– Studies of extracts that invite comparison, highlight possibilities and extend reading experiences and skills;

– Access to high quality illustrations that inform, challenge, engage developing children’s visual literacy (within fiction and information texts);

– Opportunities to compare different versions, forms and authors (through the use of different media where appropriate and relevant).

How?

Specific text choices are made and reviewed for each year group as a basis for the teaching of reading and many aspects of writing.

Specific text choices (to include film, poetry, journals, newspapers, extracts) are made to create the agreed read-aloud/shared reading curriculum for each year group.

Specific text choices are made to enable children to explore values and issues that are relevant to their lives now and in the future through a thematic approach.

Further reading is signposted, beyond the classroom, to enable children to discover and appreciate the relevance and richness of literature.

Resources, Partners and Approaches
Resources. Partners and Approaches

The Science Curriculum at MPJS

At Mount Pleasant Junior School, Science is taught to ensure children have the opportunity to work and think like a scientist. We teach Science using a carefully considered spiral curriculum so that children have the opportunity to revisit and deepen their learning in biology, chemistry and physics. We have identified the significant concepts that all children need to know and remember. These are organised into specific scientific enquiries formulated around learning questions. They explore these questions for a sequence of lessons. Within our learning questions, we have identified a number of opportunities for children to have educational visits and visitors that act as a launchpad for learning and contextualise abstract concepts for them, for example, Year 5 visit Winchester Planetarium. We also have enrichment opportunities through our responsible roles and clubs such as Gardening Gang, Team Wilder and Healthy Eating. We aim for children to leave us with both knowledge and skills to understand themselves and the world around them.

Click on the icon below to see our Science Learning Questions

Science Learning Questions
Learning Journeys
Forces
To understand how forces work, what affects them and how they are used in our everyday lives?

–          Friction

–          Air resistance

–          Water resistance

–          Gravity

–          Streamlining

Scientists:

–          Newton

–          Galileo

–          Magnets

–          Levers

–          Pulleys

–          Gears

Earth and Space
To understand what is beyond our planet and how it affects our days.

Movement of the Solar System

–          Geocentric

–          Heliocentric

–          Planets

Understanding the effects of the Earth’s movement

–          Night and day

–          Shadows

–          The sun

Phases of the moon

–          Lunar eclipse

Rocks
To know about different kinds of rocks and fossils and how they are formed.
Formation of rock

Types of rock

–          Igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic

Fossils

–          How fossils are made

–          Mary Anning

Light and Sound

To understand how light and sound behaves and how it helps us to see and hear.

–          Light sources

–          Sound sources

–          Light and darkness

–          How light travels

–          Reflection, refraction

–          How sound is made and travels

–          Vibration

Properties of materials:

–          Shadows

–          Insulating sound

–          Pitch and volume
Electricity
To know about how electricity travels, how it can be affected and how we can be safe around it.

Circuits

–          Components

–          Symbols

–          Diagrams

–          voltage

Materials

–          conductors and insulators

–          resistance

Sources of electricity

–          safety

–          appliances

–          weather

States of Matter

To know the difference between solids, liquids and gasses and how they can be changed.

–          Solids, liquids and gasses

–          Movement of molecules

–          Changes in state

–          Water cycle

–          Reversible and irreversible

Resources, Partners and Approaches
Progression of Skills
Ongoing Mark Making Progression Colour Theory Progression

Blind contour drawing

Revisit elements of shape and tone and texture

Self portrait at the beginning of each year

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mixed Media:

  • Pencil
  • Charcoal
  • Pastels
  • Chalk
  • Crayons
  • Ink
Mixed Media:

  • Poster paints
  • Watercolours
  • Pastels

Prior knowledge (from KS1):

Correctly hold a drawing tool

Begin to control the types of marks made

Tone

  • Investigate tone by drawing light and dark lines, light and dark patterns, light and dark shapes using a pencil
  • Understand tone through the use of different grades of pencil

Shape and Texture

  • Experiment with the five basic elements of shape: dots, circles, straight lines, curved lines, angled lines
  • Experiment with texture to create tone using stippling, hatching, cross-hatching, contour lines and scumbling
  • Understand and experiment with the use of line patterns to create tone

Perspective

  • Develop knowledge of how a vanishing point conveys perspective
  • Use still life paintings and sketches of landscapes to explore how perspective is created.
  • Draw an image using a single focal point

Proportion

  • Develop an understanding of proportion by studying the image of a face, taking note of the size and position of facial features in relation to each other.
  • Explore proportion of face and body
Prior knowledge (from KS1):

  • Correctly hold and use a range of painting tools and brushes
  • Explore the effects that can be made with different painting tools

Colour wheel

  • Introduce the colour wheel to explore how primary colours can be mixed to make secondary colours.
  • Explore creation of tertiary colours by mixing equal amounts of primary and secondary colours together.
  • Explore warm and cold colours using everyday understanding of the world.
  • Use the colour wheel to identify and use Complementary colours to create contrast
  • Analogous colours
  • Monochromatic colours

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Learning Questions
Year 3 Year 4  Year 5  Year 6
What story do cave paintings tell? Can repeating patterns be beautiful? What makes Anthony Gormley’s work popular? How can I read a portrait?
What is etching? (within the context of ancient art) Should paintings be realistic? Modern art Why is Vermeer considered a master of art?
How can I visit an art gallery? What was pioneering about Zaha Hadid? How did Renaissance artists work? Can abstract art convey emotion?
Resources, Partners and Approaches
How Computing is taught at Mount Pleasant Junior School

At MPJS computing is taught in a spiral curriculum composed of discrete weekly computing sessions and Learning Question units. The aims of this are to cover the National Curriculum for computing, to ensure that children have the levels of Digital Literacy to be able to function in the modern world and know how to keep themselves safe online. This intends to ensure pupils start their secondary schooling equipped with all the foundations skill necessary in coding and Digital literacy. The Learning Question units allow pupils to become fully immersed in specific areas of computing. As part of our responsible roles in school, Digital Leaders contribute to the success of units by supporting their peers. During their time at MPJS, children will become proficient in using a range of Microsoft Office software. The aim by year 6 is that children will be able to select and use the appropriate programme for a purpose.

We use Teach Computing to deliver our coding and programming Learning Questions. This ensures that children are building on basic coding skills in a progressive way. Coding is taught through a variety of programmes such as Scratch Junior and Logo. Coding is taught as part of the year 6 transition to seconadary project and is supported by secondary specialist teachers.

Online safety underpins all of our computing sessions and links with our RSHE curriculum. The Curriculum objectives are taken from the UK Council for Internet Safety ‘Education for a Connected World’ framework. This is divided into eight strands:

  • Self-image and identity
  • Managing online information
  • Online relationships
  • Health, well-being and lifestyle
  • Online reputation
  • Privacy and security
  • Online bullying
  • Copyright and ownership
Computing Progression of Skills
Year 3 Digital Literacy Coding
Autumn IT Fundamentals

  • Logging on and off
  • Opening Microsoft Word
  • Keyboard skills: One space, a capital letter using CAPS lock, a full stop.
Microsoft Word

  • Using the ‘file’ and ‘save/save as’ to save documents.
  • Change the text size and colour.
  • Write in bold and italics.
  • Underline a heading/subheading.
LQ: Branching Databases
Spring LQ: Animation

Session 1 and 2: Bee Bots

Session 3 – 12: Year  Programming animations through Scratch Junior (Teach Computing unit yr 1)

Summer IT Fundamentals

  • Opening the internet.
  • Understand and use ‘f’ and ‘j’ as home keys when touch typing.
  • Recognising the save, copy, paste and cut symbols on Microsoft Word.
Microsoft Word

  • Copy and paste an image into Microsoft Word.
  • Resize and move an image.
  • Insert and write in a text box.
  • Rearrange text.
Year 4 Digital Literacy

Coding
Autumn

Session 1 -4: Understanding algorithms

Session 5 – 14: Year 3 Programming B: Events and actions in programs

Spring IT Fundamentals

  • Opening Microsoft Powerpoint.
  • Changing between two tabs (the internet and powerpoint).
  • Opening and editing a saved document.
  • Keyboard skills: A capital letter using the shift key, a question mark, an exclamation mark.
Embedding Microsoft Word skills alongside Microsoft Powerpoint

  • Insert a new slide fit for purpose e.g. title page, heading and information, heading and image.
  • Use bullet points/numbered lists.

 

 

LQ: Programming A: Repetition in Shapes

LQ: Programming B: Repetition in Games

Summer IT Fundamentals

  • Keyboard skills: A comma, inverted commas for direct speech, apostrophes.

 

 

 

 

Embedding Microsoft Word skills alongside Microsoft Powerpoint

  • Use pre-identified text and colour schemes to present information.
  • Use animation to bring text/images in.
  • Use sound.
  • Add a timer to slides and animations to present information.
Year 5

Digital Literacy

Coding
LQ: Using Teams
Autumn IT Fundamentals

  • Keyboard skills: Using the enter key to start a new line/paragraph, shortcuts for copy and paste.
  • Copying and pasting a large piece of text from the internet by dragging the cursor.
  • Printing a file.

Embedding Microsoft Word, Microsoft Powerpoint and Teams skills.

 

 

Spring Year 5 Programming Unit A: Physical Computing
Summer IT Fundamentals

  • Using the search bar to find a program.
  • Checking and amending spellings when underlined.
  • Recognising the save, cut, copy and paste symbols on a variety of programs e.g. Microsoft and Apple.
Embedding Microsoft Word, Microsoft Powerpoint and Teams skills alongside Microsoft Publisher.

  • Use the ‘event flyer’ to create a poster.
  • Change the event flyer template to appeal to the audience.
  • Change colour scheme to appeal to the audience.
  • Insert page parts instead of text boxes.
  • Insert a saved image from google images.
LQ: Programming Unit B: Selection in Quizzes
Year 6 Digital Literacy Coding
Autumn IT Fundamentals

  • Keyboard skills: Shortcuts to copy, paste and save a document.
  • Record the source when copying and pasting an image/text.

 

 

Embedding Microsoft Word, Microsoft Powerpoint, Teams and Microsoft Publisher skills alongside Microsoft Excel

  • Create a table to present information on Excel.
  • Add columns and rows.
  • Merge columns and rows where needed.
  • Change cell colours and fonts to present information clearly.
  • Using a formula to add totals in columns/rows.
Spring

LQ Programming A: Using Variables in Games

LQ: Music and Computing

Summer IT Fundamentals

  • Creating a folder to organise files.
  • Copy and paste files into relevant folders.
  • Place fingers in the correct position for touch typing.
Selecting the most appropriate Microsoft Office program based on purpose and audience of task. LQ Cantell Computing Transition Project
Learning Questions
Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
How do stitches join and decorate? How can I create patterns on fabric? What is bread and how do we make it? How can I reuse textiles?
How can I use wood to make a picture frame? How can I make bread with oil? How can mechanisms create movement? What leavens bread?
How can I make flatbreads? How can I make a moving toy vehicle? How can I use knots? How can I make a radio?
How Geography is taught at Mount Pleasant Junior School

At MPJS, we enable our children to become skilled geographers through an enquiry- based curriculum that utilises our diverse coastal & river-bound city.  Worthwhile enrichment opportunities act as a launch-pad for learning, with meaningful fieldwork opportunities that explore both the impact of humans upon the environment and vice versa, with both urban and river studies.

Within our curriculum, children have opportunities to be immersed in geographical learning through carefully sequenced, cumulative and robust learning questions, which both build on prior knowledge and deepen understanding of geographical concepts.  This immersion, followed by opportunities to deepen and revisit, allow children to develop a strong understanding of geographical language and subject-specific vocabulary, as well as to know more and remember more.  Learning is couched in dialogue which encourages rich discussion and analysis of key themes to establish a deep understanding of locational and place knowledge and human and physical processes. Acquisition of this substantive knowledge is facilitated by a curriculum that addresses geographical concepts of place, space, scale, interdependence, cultural awareness and diversity, environmental impact and sustainability.  Children are competent to carry out geographical enquiries and are can apply skills in observing, collecting, analysing, evaluating and communicating geographical information.  They are able to create written narrative and analyses, referencing similarities, differences and changes and utilising a variety of sources, such as maps, globes, atlases, aerial photographs and images.

Each learning question and year group builds on the geographical learning journey of the previous years, both in chronology and in the development of geographical skills and processes, so that our children are ready for KS3 and beyond and are imbued with a sense of the complexity and wonder of our world and the diversity of cultures within it.

Learning Journey

History at Mount Pleasant Junior School

What is unique about studying history?

History is far more than facts and dates. Through the study of the past, we learn about how the world has been shaped, both here and abroad, through historically significant periods, which may last a few hours, as in the sinking of the Titanic, or span hundreds of years, such as the Roman occupation of Britain.

Historical enquiry allows for understanding and exploration of causation and consequence, as well as chances to compare similarities and differences critically. By also considering change and continuity, we are able to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse change, and frame historically – valid questions. Within history, we come to understand the use of evidence and the rigorous process that surrounds historical evidence. It enables us to understand how contrasting arguments can exist.

What is the purpose of the study of history?

A high-quality history education will help pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. It should inspire pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past. Teaching should equip pupils to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement. History helps pupils to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time.

What does the study of history look like at MPJS?

At MPJS, we enable our children to become skilled historians through an enquiry- based curriculum that utilises our historically- rich city. Worthwhile enrichment opportunities act as a launch-pad for learning, with visits to the local area (such as Sea City Museum), as well as further afield (for example, Fishbourne Palace and Hampton Court).

Within our curriculum, children have opportunities to be immersed in historical learning through carefully sequenced, cumulative and robust learning questions, which both build on prior knowledge and deepen understanding of historical concepts. This immersion, followed by opportunities to deepen and revisit, allow children to develop a strong understanding of historical language and subject-specific vocabulary, as well as to know more and remember more. Learning is couched in dialogue which encourages rich discussion and analysis of key themes to establish a deep understanding of social, political and religious fields of study. Key themes of society, civilisation, legacy, governance (changing power) and monarchy underpin substantive knowledge and run parallel with historical concepts of change and continuity, causation and consequence, similarity & difference and historical significance. Children are able to apply their knowledge and skills to create written narrative and analyses, referencing primary and secondary sources.

Each learning question and year group builds on the historical learning journey of the previous years, both in chronology and in the development of historical skills and processes, so that our children are ready for KS3 and beyond.

Learning Questions

Click on the icon below to view our History Learning Questions

History Learning Questions
Resources, Partners and Approaches
Learning Journey
Current Music Provision
Aspect of music Content Continued support from Southampton Music Hub to ensure that the learning progressive and will build on prior knowledge.

Learning Question weeks

– 3 x 1 week blocked units a year with the exception of year 4 who do a two week block of instrument lessons

 

Starting point for years 3, 5 and 6 is soundscapes -Continued support from Southampton Music Hub to ensure that the learning progressive and will build on prior knowledge.

Music Assemblies

-Whole school

-Weekly

Singing lesson:

-Focus on using the voice as an instrument

-Includes a vocal warm up and learning a wide range of songs

Music appreciation:

-Listen to a piece of music from a wide range of times and places

-Explore the effect of the music on the listener

-Explore the musical dimensions (tempo, pitch, dynamics, structure, timbre, texture)

-Embed use of musical vocabulary

-Planning for music assemblies and record of music used

Choir

-30 minutes weekly

-Year 5 and 6

  • Warm up – more focused on technical singing
  • Songs learn mainly in unison, but moving to part singing

-Move to more part singing, ability to keep part and consistently sing in tune.

-Take part in massed choir events with the Music Hub, Platinum Jubilee Celebrations

Brass Tuition

-1 hour weekly after school

-Year 3,4,5 and 6

-20 pupils

-Tuition provided by a specialist teacher

-Care of instrument

-Technique for playing

-How to read music notation on a stave

– Tuition in
Enrichment opportunities

WNO

Theatre – WNO

Artsmark

Partnership with MAST

Content of music appreciation assemblies summer 2021
Music Genre/Instrument Learning Focus
In the Mood – Glenn Miller Big Band Swing

Brass Instruments

Pitch

Acrobat – Brass Band

Trombone and its slide

Pitch and Tempo

Redemption song – instrument featuring the Kaneh Mason family

Popular music

String family

Strings and Piano

Rhythm and steady beat

Two Reels

Violin (fiddle)

British Folk Music

Tempo of the different pieces

Pitch

The Little Train of Caipira Orchestral Music/Samba instruments

Creation of a soundscape

Tempo

Ravi Shankar – symphony

Indian Music

Sitar and orchestra

Melody (raga)

Rhythm (Tala)

Content of music appreciation assemblies autumn 2021
Music Genre/Instrument Learning Focus
Carnival of the Animals – featuring the Kaneh Mason family – Lion Orchestral Music – piano and strings

Tempo

Fanfare

Scales to create the roar

Carnival of the Animals – featuring the Kaneh Mason family – Elephant Orchestral Music – piano and double bass

Pitch

Tempo

Melody

Carnival of the Animals – featuring the Kaneh Mason family – Aquarium Orchestral Music – piano, strings, flute and glass harmonica

Pitch

Tempo

Melody

Creation of mood related to year 6 learning question

Adiemus – Karl Jenkins Voice – and use of choir Use of the voice as an instrument
Allegri’s Misere Voice – choral music

Pitch

Unison and Harmony

Mozart’s Piano Concerto Orchestra and piano

Texture

Dynamics

Resources, Partners and Approaches
Resources, Partners and Approaches
RE Curriculum

At Mount Pleasant Junior School, Religious Education is taught in accordance with the legal requirements of Living Difference III – the Agreed syllabus for schools in Hampshire, Portsmouth, Southampton and the Isle of Wight.  This Document is the statutory framework, which defines the matters, skills and processes that need to be taught. We follow a common enquiry cycle, enabling pupils to become familiar with asking and answering questions, always beginning with their own experiences of a concept before contextualizing it into another world religion.

The curriculum is delivered through Learning Questions; these are concept-led and contextualised through specific religions. As per the syllabus of Living Difference III, pupils learn about Christianity and two world religions across Key stage 2 (lower key stage 2, Christianity and Hinduism and Upper stage 2, Christianity and Judaism).  We draw upon our diverse school community to build knowledge of a range of religions and give pupils the opportunity to make sense of the world they live in.

 

Rationale 

Religious education can provide a rich and wide range of experiences inside and outside the classroom, which give children opportunities to develop concepts and skills that will help them to make sense of their own experiences and beliefs, and to understand the beliefs and practices of members of faith communities through open, fair-minded enquiry.  This entails enabling children to interpret and respond to a variety of concepts, beliefs and practices within religions and to their own and others’ cultural and life experiences.  This takes the form of encountering religious stories, festivals, artefacts, places of worships and beliefs. Indoctrination and conversion are not part of the educational process and therefore have no place in religious education. Religious education is an educational subject in its own right, taught within an educational framework.

Assessment
End of Year 4
Commuicate Children can describe their own responses to the human experience of the concepts studied.
Apply They can describe examples of how their responses are, or can be, applied in their own lives and the lives of others.
Enquire They can describe key concepts that are common to all people as well as those that are common to the lives of many living a religiuos life (A and B concepts)
Contextualise They can describe how these concepts are contextualised within some of the beliefs and/or practices and/or ways of life people living in a religious life in the religion studied.
Evaluate They can evaluate human experience of the concepts by describing their value to people and through dialoguing with others can recognise, identify and describe some issues raised.
End of Year 6
Commuicate Children and young people can explain their own response to the human experience of the concepts explored.
Apply They can explain examples of how their responses to the concepts can be applied in their own lives and the lives of others.
Enquire Children and young people can explain key concepts that are common to all people  (A concepts) asa well as those that are common to many religions (B concepts) and they can describe some key concepts that are particular to the specific religions studied (C concepts)
Contextualise They can explain how these concepts are contextualised within the beliefs and/or practices and/or the ways of life people living in a religious life in the religions studied.
Evaluate They can evaluate the concepts by explaining their value to people living a religious life by drawing on examples. Dialoguing with other children will enable them to discern for themselves and so identify and describe in increasingly complex ways some of the issues they raise.
Learning Journey

Please click on the link below to read our Relationships, Sex and Health Policy

RSHE Policy

Resources, Partners and Approaches

Spanish Curriculum

Whilst we know that most MPJS pupils are already accomplished linguists, all children are entitled to languages learning at KS2. To support languages learning at Secondary School, we have selected Spanish and each week, children have a Spanish lesson with half termly opportunities to work with a Secondary Spanish teacher from Cantell School.

Currently, year groups are following a similar programme of study, which will change as each year group develops expertise.

LKS2 Y3 and Y4
Los Colores y Los Numeros (colours and numbers)
Autumn 1 Yo Aprendo Espanol (I’m learning Spanish)
Autumn 2 Los Animales (Animals) Los Instrumentos (musical instruments)
Spring 1 Puedo… (I can) Los Colores y Los Numeros (colours and numbers)
Spring 2 La Fruta (Fruits) Las Verduras (Vegetables)
Summer 1 Los Saludos (Greetings) Canciones Infantiles (Nursery Rhymes)
Summer 2 Las Estaciones (The seasons) Los Helados (ice-cream)
 UKS2 Y5 and Y6

Los Colores y Los Numeros (colours and numbers)

Canciones Infantiles (Nursery Rhymes)

Autumn 1 Yo Aprendo Espanol (I’m learning Spanish)
Autumn 2 Me Presento (Presenting myself) La Familia (Family)
Spring 1 Desayuno En El Café (At the café) Mi Clase (In the classroom)
Spring 2 Tienes una mascota? (Do you have a pet?) Que fecha Es Hoy? (What date is it?)
Summer 1 Que Tiempo Hace? (What is the weather?) Habitats (Habitats)
Summer 2 La Ropa (Clothes) Mi Casa (my home)
Resources, Partners and Approaches